Linux developer and sysadmin Aaron Toponce drops Google’s Feedburner, goes with native RSS in light of Google’s dropping Reader

The logo for Google's Feedburner RSS serviceAs the news of Google dropping its Reader RSS service spreads, at least some of those who relied on Google Reader to read blogs and other sites via their RSS are pledging to drop other Google services. I expect this is both in protest and as a hedge against Google dumping other unprofitable sidelines from its portfolio of services.

In this vein, Linux developer and sysadmin Aaron Toponce has announced that he will no longer run his blog’s RSS through Feedburner, Google’s RSS-delivery service (is that what you call it?) that allows normal people to both maintain a consistent RSS address no matter what they’re feeding into it and get statistics on popularity of a given feed and the items in it:

Due to the recent news about Google shutting down a number of services, including Reader an the CalDAV API, I came to the realization that my RSS source for this blog should probably go back to the main feed. So, as of July 1, 2013, the same day Reader shuts down, the old feed at http://feeds2.feedburner.com/pthree will be deprecated in favor of http://pthree.org/feed.

I’m a heavy users of Google’s Feeedburner service. Not only do I run dozens of feeds through it, but I make equally heavy use of the BuzzBoost feature to turn RSS feeds into Javascript embeds that drop tagged HTML on a web page.

It’s something that has proven invaluable. I’d love for an easy way to turn RSS into tagged HTML on my own server, and I bet there are more than a few easy-enough ways to do that with Perl, Python or some other scripting language. Feedburner just makes it so easy. But for how long?

Clearly Aaron is doing more than making a (political?) statement. He’s making sure Google doesn’t throw him under some kind of digital-services bus.